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Interactive flower structure and 9 flower parts in a fun online biology learning game.

"Flower Structure Online Puzzle" is a free online knowledge level game, about the structure of a mature plant flower in Monecious plants, where male and female reproductive organs are on the same plant. Drag and drop the flower parts in the correct place on the diagram. A small puzzle game for desktop computers, laptops and tablets, which may be played in the web browser. The Biology Knowledge Board include 9 pieces to play with. The game is part of the Interactive Biological Laboratory educational tools.


This fun educational class may answer some of the following questions:
  • Which are the parts of the flower?
  • What is a Stamen?
  • Where are the Petals situated in the flower diagram?
  • What is the structure of a mature monecious flower of a plant?
Flower Structure Online Puzzle Picture

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How to play Flower Structure Online Puzzle

The flower parts are situated around the stylized greyscale diagram. Drag and drop the colored parts in the correct place in the diagram. The pictures will reamin active untill arranged correctly. The tries counter is used for evaluation - 9 tries for "A".


Knowledge Achievements:
Know 9 flower structure parts and get +1 Knowledge Level on Planeta 42 website.
Here is a gameplay movie on YouTube.

Flower Structure Online Puzzle Screenshot

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Class subject: Monecious flower structure.

The plant flower main function is for reproduction. After the whole process of pollination and development the flower become, or produce seeds. Flowers comes in all varieties of shapes, colors, structures and functions. Also they are Dioecious, where we have a male and female plants and Monecious, here one flower can self pollinate. With this game we have a common structure of a Monecious flower plant and its parts and functions:

1. Petals > Corolla - The flower corolla is composed of units called petals, which are typically thin, soft and colored to attract animals that help the process of pollination.

2. Sepals > Calyx - The flower calyx is the outermost whorl consisting of units called sepals. They are typically green and enclose the rest of the flower in the bud stage.

3. Pedicel > Stem - The pedicel is a stem that attaches a single flower to the inflorescence.

4. Stamen - The stamen is the pollen-producing reproductive organ of a flower.

5. Filament - A stamen typically consists of a stalk called the filament, used as stem of the anther.

6. Anther - The anther is part of the stamen, which contains microsporangia. Most commonly anthers are two-lobed and are attached to the filament either at the base or in the middle area of the anther.

7. Stigma - The stigma, together with the ovary comprises the pistil, which is the female reproductive organ of a plant. The stigma forms the distal portion of the style or stylodia.

8. Ovary - In the flowering plants, an ovary is a part of the female reproductive organ of the flower or gynoecium.

9. Ovule - In seed plants, the ovule is the structure that gives rise to and contains the female reproductive cells.


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